What is the percentage of people recovering from drugs?

Research shows that 75% of people with addiction survive and live full lives, especially if they receive good treatment. Substance use disorders are chronic medical conditions for some people that require comprehensive, ongoing care. However, at the population level, they are characterized by varying levels of severity, from mild to severe grief and functional impairments. In parallel, many people are in remission from SUD, most of whom have milder symptoms and can improve without any formal treatment.

Research on solving substance use problems has tended to focus on one end of the severity spectrum or the other, although population studies covering all levels of severity can help broadly inform the knowledge and policies of treatment support services and recovery. In this study, the authors use a national survey to estimate the number of adults in the United States who have had a substance use problem in their lifetime and the percentage of adults who have resolved their substance use problem. Very few studies have examined those who have solved a substance use problem. Able to derive national estimates from the study), found that nearly 1 in 10 adults in the U.S.

UU. They had solved a significant alcohol or other drug problem, and half of those identified as “recovering”. However, little is known about those who have solved a problem compared to those who currently have a substance use problem. More data on the differences between people with substance use problems who solve or have not yet resolved their problem can provide key information about treatment and recovery support services policies in the U.S.

In this study, researchers used a national survey to estimate the number of adults in the United States who have had a substance use problem in their lifetime and the percentage of adults who have resolved their substance use problem. They also examined sociodemographic and substance use histories that predict recovery from a substance use problem. Findings from the study may highlight characteristics that predict resolution of a substance use problem and inform expansion of treatment and support services. The analysis also used a new set of similar questions in which study participants were asked about lifelong recognition and recovery from a mental health problem.

In addition to these new questions on substance use and mental health, the NSDUH collects a wide range of data on sociodemographics, lifetime and past year substance use profiles, and substance use treatment histories. Adults Report Recovering From Substance Use Problem. Overall, 11.1% of the sample reported having a substance use problem, which translates to approximately 27.5 million adults in the United States. Of those who reported a substance use problem in their lifetime, 74.8 per cent reported that they were recovering or recovering from their substance use problem, which translates to approximately 20.5 million adults in the United States.

Among adults with a lifelong mental health problem, but who are not recovering from this problem, 31.9% reported having a substance use problem. Among adults recovering from a lifelong mental health problem, 29.7% reported having a substance use problem. This compares to only 7.0% who ever had a substance use problem among those who reported never having a mental health problem in their lifetime. Certain sociodemographic characteristics and the status of mental health problems increased or decreased the chances of recovering from a substance use problem.

Certain substance use profiles and history of substance use treatment were associated with the status of. Regardless of recovery status, those who report a lifelong substance use problem have a high prevalence of tobacco use and nicotine dependence. More than 90% of people with a lifelong substance use problem reported ever using tobacco, approximately half reported using tobacco in the past year, and nearly 20% had nicotine dependence according to the Ni-Dependency Syndrome Scale. These percentages were similar, regardless of the state of recovery.

The findings of this study, along with other nationally representative studies, make it clear that there are tens of millions of people in the United States who have solved a significant alcohol or other drug problem. This goes against the cultural narrative, where substance use problems are often described as chronic and recurrent conditions, implying that those affected can never be and stay well. These findings corroborate the findings of the National Recovery Study, a similar cross-sectional study (i.e. Look at a person (at a given time) who examined those who have solved a substance use problem in more detail.

Follow a person over time) will provide greater understanding and confirmation of these findings. An interesting finding from this study was that those who reported recovering from a substance use problem were twice as likely to have received treatment for SUD in the past year and throughout their lives compared to those who were not in recovery. However, only 40% of those who had recovered from a substance use problem had ever received SUD treatment. Taken together, these data suggest that treatment can help a person resolve an alcohol or drug problem, but most people will recover without using formal treatment, either through other avenues of recovery (e.g.

mutual aid organizations) or without using any formal service (i.e. Although not discussed in this study, previous research suggests that those who can recover without the use of any external service support generally tend to have a history of less serious addiction problems. Those in recovery were more likely to report lifetime injecting drug use compared to those who were not in recovery. Substance use problems are likely to fall within a spectrum, from severe and chronic SUD with many substance-related consequences to more discreet bouts of drunkenness that may have led to a family or legal consequence.

Those with more serious substance use problems may be more likely to suffer more serious and cumulative consequences, making them more likely, in turn, to seek treatment for SUD, increasing the chances of resolving their problem. This also exposes them to the idea of abstinence and to the adoption of a social recovery identity. This may partly explain the decreased likelihood that those in recovery will report substance use last year compared to those who are not in recovery. Only 7.0% of people without a lifelong mental health problem reported having a substance use problem, while more than 30% of people with a history of a mental health problem reported ever having a substance use problem.

This finding parallels the literature on the common comorbidity of substance use disorders and mental illnesses, called “concurrent disorders” or “dual diagnosis”. In particular, those who were recovering from a mental health problem were more likely to report recovery from a substance use problem, while those who were not recovering from a mental health problem were less likely to report recovery from a substance use problem. substances. These findings emphasize the need to improve care for people with co-occurring disorders, possibly through the integration of substance use and mental health treatment, and highlight the potential synergistic effect of treating a mental health condition when a person also has, or is at risk of develop, a substance use disorder.

The process of supporting recovery from a substance use problem can have overlapping effects that also support recovery from a mental health problem. Both lifetime tobacco use and the previous year, as well as nicotine dependence in the past month among those who have ever had a substance use problem, was higher than the general population, regardless of recovery status. Other research suggests that those who have recently solved a substance use problem may show a greater willingness to quit smoking compared to previous generations, and many people quit smoking before reporting resolution of the substance use problem. Taken together, these findings suggest that smoking cessation programs aimed at both those currently experiencing and those who recently resolve a substance use problem can improve the health of the population and lower the burden of health care.

Although people in recovery were less likely to report using a wide range of substances over the past year, 32% reported drinking heavily last month and 31% reported using marijuana last year, as did 40% of the National Recovery Study sample that identified as “in recovery” used one or more substances. This runs counter to the popular historical and cultural meaning of “recovery”, since it normally requires abstinence from all substances. Therefore, from a public health perspective, encouraging as many people with substance use problems as possible to reduce or stop using substances will likely require a framework that can include, but also broadens, this common cultural understanding. In addition, research is needed to better understand how people perceive substance use problems, treatment seeking and recovery identity, especially among sociodemographic groups, so that services and links to these services can be adapted to specific populations.

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